Harry S. Truman Presidential Library & Museum

Executive Orders
Harry S. Truman
1945-1953

President Harry S. Truman.  Source: Truman Library.

Executive orders are official documents, numbered consecutively, through which the President of the United States manages the operations of the Federal Government.

The text of executive orders appears in the daily Federal Register as each executive order is signed by the President and received by the Office of the Federal Register. The text of executive orders beginning with Executive Order 7316 of March 13, 1936, also appears in the sequential editions of Title 3 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). Tables that are part of the executive orders are not included in this web site, please see the CFR for the tables.


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February 21, 1949
  EXECUTIVE ORDER 10039

AUTHORIZING THE CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION TO CONFER A COMPETITIVE STATUS UPON MISS WINIFRED R. DONNELLON

By virtue of the authority vested in me by section 2 of the Civil Service Act (22 Stat. 403:
5 U.S.C. 633), and by section 1753 of the Revised Statutes (5 U.S.C. 631), and pursuant to the recommendation of the Secretary of State, the Civil Service Commission is hereby authorized to confer a competitive status upon Miss Winifred R. Donnellon, an employee of the United States Passport Agency, Department of State, without regard to the competitive provisions of the Civil Service Rules

Miss Donnellon has been employed by the Department of State for more than twenty-seven years under appointments excepted from civil-service requirements. If Miss Donnellon had remained in the position in the Department of State from which she was transferred in 1945 at the convenience of the Department, she would have become eligible in 1946 to acquire a competitive status under noncompetitive procedures of the Civil Service Commission.

HARRY S. TRUMAN
THE WHITE HOUSE,
February 21, 1949