Harry S. Truman Presidential Library & Museum

Proclamations
Harry S. Truman
1945-1953

President Harry S. Truman.  Source: Truman Library.

Proclamations are official documents, numbered consecutively, through which the President of the United States manages the operations of the Federal Government.

Proclamations are intended for individuals outside of the government, while executive orders are intended for individuals within the government. Tables that are part of the proclamations are not included in this web site, please see the Code of Federal Regulations for the tables.


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December 16, 1947

  PROCLAMATION 2761

A [CARRYING OUT GENERAL AGREEMENT ON TARIFFS AND TRADE CONCLUDED AT GENEVA, OCTOBER 30, 1947 (1)]

WHEREAS (1) section 350(a) and (b) of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended by section 1 of the act of June 12, 1934 entitled "AN ACT To amend the Tariff Act of 1930," by the Joint Resolution approved June 7, 1943, and by section 2 of the Act of July 5, 1945, provides as follows:

SEC. 350. (a) For the purpose of expanding foreign markets for the products of the United States (as a means of assisting in the present emergency in restoring the American standard of living, in overcoming domestic unemployment and the present economic depression, in increasing the purchasing power of the American public, and in establishing and maintaining a better relationship among various branches of American agriculture, industry, mining, and commerce) by regulating the admission of foreign goods into the United States in accordance with the characteristics and needs of various branches of American production so that foreign markets will be made available to those branches of American production which require and are capable of developing such outlets by affording corresponding market opportunities for foreign products in the United States, the President, whenever he finds as a fact that any existing duties or other import restrictions of the United States or any foreign country are unduly burdening and restricting the foreign trade of the United States and that the purpose above declared will be promoted by the means hereinafter specified, is authorized from time to time -

(1) To enter into foreign trade agreements with foreign governments or instrumentalities thereof; and

(2) To proclaim such modifications of existing duties and other import restrictions, or such additional import restrictions, or such continuance, and for such minimum periods, of existing customs or excise treatment of any article covered by foreign trade agreements, as are required or appropriate to carry out any foreign trade agreement that the President has entered into hereunder. No proclamation shall be made increasing or decreasing by more than 50 per centum any rate of duty, however established, existing on January 1, 1945 (even though temporarily suspended by Act of Congress), or transferring any article between the dutiable and free lists. The proclaimed duties and other import restrictions shall apply to articles the growth, produce, or manufacture of all foreign countries, whether imported directly, or indirectly: Provided, That the President may suspend the application to articles the growth, produce, or manufacture of any country because of its discriminatory treatment of American commerce or because of other acts (including the operations of international cartels) or policies which in his opinion tend to defeat the purposes set forth in this section; and the proclaimed duties and other import restrictions shall be in effect from and after such time as is specified in the proclamation. The President may at any time terminate any such proclamation in whole or in part.

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